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Indiana University Bloomington

Jeffrey Huber

Dr. Jeffrey Huber

Professor of Practice

 

jhuber [at] indiana.edu

office: PY 357 | (812)856-2390

 

Similarities between psychological processes that mediate classroom learning and performance and motor learning and performance. Applying psychological theories, principles, and research in developing expert coaches and elite athletes.

Educational Background

  • 1989 - Ph.D. University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • 1985 - M.Ed. University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • 1978 - M.A. California State University, Fullerton
  • 1975 - B.S. University of Wisconsin, Madison

Areas of Interest

  • Similarities between student learning and athlete learning
  • Cognitive processes mediating motor learning and performance
  • How athletes learn, how coaches teach—a psychological perspective
  • Developing coach and athlete expertise
  • Acceleration of the motor learning and performance processes

Research Summary

Over the course of my 37 year collegiate coaching career working with hundreds of athletes, I conducted what might be considered an informal longitudinal study. Some of the things I learned during this time period include:

  • Teaching a motor skill in an athletic setting is, in many ways, similar to teaching an academic subject in a classroom.
  • Cognition plays a role in motor learning just as it does in classroom learning.
  • Coaching and learning are about making connections—cognitively, physiologically, emotionally, psychologically, etc.
  • Employing psychological theories, principles, and research accelerates the motor learning and performance processes.
  • Effective coaching involves developing athletes' physical, mental, and emotional abilities.
  • Effective coaching involves developing psychologically healthy, competent, and confident athletes who possess a sense of self-worth.
  • Coaching is both an art and a science.
  • Coach and athlete expertise can be achieved with effective training (e.g., deliberate practice).
  • The processes of how athletes learn and how coaches teach are inseparable.

Representative Publications

    Huber, J.J. (2013). Applying educational psychology in coaching athletes. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

    Huber, J.J. (2013 projected publication date). The essentials of springboard and platform diving. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

    Huber, J.J. (2007). Becoming a champion diver: Striving to reach your greatest potential. DVD. Ames, IA: Championship Books and Video Productions.

    Huber, J.J. (2007). Practice management and discipline. In R. M. Malina & J. L. Gabriel (Eds.), USA diving coach development reference manual (pp. 219-230). Indianapolis, IN: USA Diving Publications.

    Huber, J.J. (2007). Cognition related to skill development and diving performance: Helping divers cognitively resemble elite level divers. In R. M. Malina & J. L. Gabriel (Eds.), USA diving coach development reference manual (pp. 279-288). Indianapolis, IN: USA Diving Publications.

    Huber, J.J. (1997). Differences in problem representation and procedural knowledge between elite and non-elite springboard divers. The Sport Psychologist, 11 (2), 142-159.

    Huber, J.J. (1987). Adams' closed-loop theory of motor learning and its implications for diving coaches. The Diver, 8 (9), 9-12.

    Huber, J.J. (1987). The warm-up decrement phenomenon and the set hypothesis: Implications for diving performance. The Diver, 8 (8), 14-15.